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Coloring in the gray Areas with @andersonangelico

To see more of Anderson’s colorful São Paulo, follow @andersonangelico on Instagram.

São Paulo might be best known for its gray cityscapes, but local Instagrammer Anderson Angelico’s (@andersonangelico), photos tell a more colorful story. “It’s not easy to find color here, but if you pay close attention you can find it. Colors bring happiness and remind me of something childlike, says Anderson, who loves exploring hidden and winding streets. “My favorite colors are yellow and red, and the other day I was overjoyed to find a yellow building with red windows in São Paulo’s city center.” Whenever possible, he tries to place people in front of his urban scenarios. “Streets are incredibly inspiring to me. They are full of people, hidden colors and so many different situations just waiting to be captured.”

newsweek
newsweek:

Facebook might understand your romantic prospects better than you do. In a blog post published yesterday, the company’s team of data scientists announced that statistical evidence hints at budding relationships before the relationships start.
As couples become couples, Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk writes, the two people enter a period of courtship, during which timeline posts increase. After the couple makes it official, their posts on each others’ walls decrease—presumably because the happy two are spending more time together.
In the post on Facebook’s data science blog, Diuk gives hard numbers: During the 100 days before the relationship starts, we observe a slow but steady increase in the number of timeline posts shared between the future couple. When the relationship starts (“day 0”), posts begin to decrease. We observe a peak of 1.67 posts per day 12 days before the relationship begins, and a lowest point of 1.53 posts per day 85 days into the relationship.
Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world. When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

newsweek:

Facebook might understand your romantic prospects better than you do. In a blog post published yesterday, the company’s team of data scientists announced that statistical evidence hints at budding relationships before the relationships start.

As couples become couples, Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk writes, the two people enter a period of courtship, during which timeline posts increase. After the couple makes it official, their posts on each others’ walls decrease—presumably because the happy two are spending more time together.

In the post on Facebook’s data science blog, Diuk gives hard numbers: During the 100 days before the relationship starts, we observe a slow but steady increase in the number of timeline posts shared between the future couple. When the relationship starts (“day 0”), posts begin to decrease. We observe a peak of 1.67 posts per day 12 days before the relationship begins, and a lowest point of 1.53 posts per day 85 days into the relationship.

Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world. When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

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